Tag Archives: Ben Whishaw

Mary Poppins Returns (2018) Review

A MOSTLY “PRACTICAL

PERFECT” SEQUEL


 

Winds in the east, mist coming in. Like somethin’ is brewin’ and ‘bout to begin. Can’t put me finger on what lies in store. But I feel what’s to happen all happened before”. Such is one of the first lines uttered in Disney’s 1964 live-action film Mary Poppins. Based on the children’s novels by English author P.L. Travers, the movie, which was directed by Robert Stevenson and starred actor Dick Van Dyke and actress Julie Andrews, tells the story of a magical nanny (named Marry Poppins) who visits a dysfunctional family (the Banks family) in London and employs her unique and whimsical brand of lifestyle to improve the family’s dynamics through a series of events. The film was met with critical acclaim, with many praising the feature for its narrative heart and imaginative nuances throughout the feature (the combination of live-action and animation) as well as the acting talents from Andrews and Dyke in the movie. Mary Poppins also received 13 Academy Awards nomination (setting a record for any other film released by the Walt Disney studios) and won five of those wards, including Best Actress for Andrews, Best Film Editing, Best Original Music Score, Best Visual Effects, and Best Original Song for “Chim Chim Cher-ee”. Since it’s theatrical release back in 1964, Mary Poppins continues to enchant viewers new and old on various home video releases, receiving many prestigious awards throughout the years, including being selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. Now, almost 54 years since Mary Poppins graced the silver screen, it’s time to everyone’s favorite nanny to return as Walt Disney Studios and director Rob Marshall presents Mary Poppins Returns. Is this log belated sequel from the “house of mouse” worth a glance or is it a far cry from the beloved classic? Read more

Paddington 2 (2018) Review

IF WE’RE KIND AND POLITE,

THE WORLD WILL BE RIGHT


 

Back at the beginning of 2015, during the same January opening weekend that Kevin Hart’s comedy film Wedding Ringer and Bradley Cooper’s bio-pic drama American Sniper were released, a little and polite bear made his first big-screen debut with the movie Paddington. First released in November of 2014 in the UK (before making his US debut a few months later), Paddington, which was based off of the book character of the same name from author Michael Bond, was directed by Paul King and the tale of a young polite bear named Paddington, who moved into the Brown family in London and learned what it meant to be a part of a family, while evading the grips of a villainous taxidermist. It was a whimsical film that featured childish fun and mischief, with the movie being targeted for the young “juice box” crowd”, but also presented a heartwarming tale of family and acceptance. Paddington went on gain mostly positive reviews from both critics and moviegoers everywhere and did gain a sizeable return on its investment, cultivating roughly $268 million against its production budget, which estimated around $50 million. This success proved strong enough for a follow-up adventure to be greenlit to be commissioned in sometime in the near future. Now, StudioCanal, Heday Films and director Paul King present the second chapter in the world’s most “polite” bear with the movie Paddington 2. Does this second installment shine bright as its predecessor or does it fail to impress and lack emotional heart and mischievous fun in this second helping of a feature? Read more

In the Heart of the Sea Review

A WHALE OF A TALE (KIND OF)


 

Call me Ishamel!” comes the famous opening line from Herman Melville’s literary masterpiece Moby Dick. Written back in 1851, Moby Dick (originally called “The Whale” before changing to the more definitve name of Moby Dick) recounts the fictional tale of a sailor (Ishamel) and the obsesse-driven quest of his captain (Ahab) for revenge on a great white whale named Moby Dick. With its literary- Shakespearean prose, common themes and detailed descriptions of whale hunting (amongst various others aspects), Moby Dick went on to become a true fictional classic, with countless reprints of the book over the years from different publications. Even the basic premise of Moby Dick has transcended beyond Melville’s written work, with characters like Captain Ahab and Moby Dick appearing in various media facets (cartoons, films, TV, and other literary works). Now director Ron Howard retraces the true life account that which inspired Melville’s work in the movie In the Heart of the Sea. Is it a compelling non-fictional movie or is and is it an uninspiring “There she blows”?
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Spectre Review

THE SPECTERS OF SPECTRE


 

The man (James Bond), the myth (Bond), and the icon (007). Such are the names that come to mind when speaking about Ian Fleming’s most notorious spy super sleuth: James Bond. Moreover, the Hollywood feature films of Fleming’s character of Bond have become more iconic, spanning over 53 years with several different actors stepping into the role of 007. The most recent incarnation of this comes from British actor Daniel Craig, who has exploded on-screen with a more “gritter” and action-oriented Bond with his films Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace, and Skyfall. Now, after three years of being away from the silver screen, Daniel Craig’s Bond returns in the new movie Spectre. Does this latest theatrical chapter of 007 meet its high expectations or is it just another run-of-the-mill James Bond flick? Read more

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