Tag Archives: Neil Burger

The Upside (2019) Review

A POIGNANT (YET FLAT)

HOLLYWOOD REMAKE


 

Hollywood is still fascinated with remakes and it’s a paradoxical thing for major motion picture studios to “bank” on when crafting feature length movies. The idea of reimagining a cinematic narrative and repurposing it for a new modern moviegoing audience is something that seems to work, especially in the profitable eyes of film studios, but it does come with its fair share of criticism. Of course, this shows that Hollywood (speaking in general terms) is running out of ideas; embracing the idea something that worked in the past can be used once again in the present (i.e. slightly altering its cinematic make-up). In general, most of these endeavors do fail and / or don’t quite measure up in trying to surpass the likeability (or entertainment) of the original movie. However, there are a few Hollywood remakes that are better than their original counterpart, including 1982’s The Thing (1951’s The Thing from Another World), 1988’s Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1964’s Bedtime Story), 2006’s The Departed (2002’s Internal Affairs), and most recently 2018’s A Star is Born (1937’s A Star is Born). Now, in Hollywood’s on-going crusade of continuing its trend of revamping and rebooting old motion pictures, STX Films, Lantern Entertainment, and director Neil Burger present the remake of the 2011 film The Untouchables with the movie The Upside. Does this latest Hollywood remake rise to the challenge or does it flounder in being yet another pointless remake from Tinseltown? Read more

Divergent Review

A GOOD, BUT FAMILIAR START


 

Vampires, werewolves, and demon hunters, are now on the outskirts of what’s consider “In” right now with most teens. Paranormal romances of these dark, nocturnal creatures are beginning to fade and are being replaced with tales of dystopian realties. Stories of bleak futuristic settings, indoctrinated caste systems, oppressive governments, and rebellious uprising are the new rage in Teen YA books, which appeal to both adolescent genders. So, considering the dominating success of The Hunger Games movie franchise, it comes as no surprise that Hollywood has begun to buy up the rights to several of these popular book series to be viewed as feature films. Summit Entertainment plunges head first into this teen dystopian mindset with the film adaptation of Divergent, the first installment of a trilogy book series by Veronica Roth. Is Divergent the second coming for these types of grim futuristic movies or is it another novel adaptation that doesn’t live up to its namesake? Read more