Tag Archives: Marvel

Captain Marvel (2019) Review

HIGHER. FURTHER. FASTER.


 

The Marvel Cinematic Universe (i.e. the MCU) has indeed become a dominant force in both the superhero genre of filmmaking as well as cinematic blockbusters genre. Since the franchise began back in 2008, the MCU has quite literally ascended to popular movie franchise stardom, producing a continuing narrative of interconnected superhero feature films (all from which are comic book source material properties from Marvel comics) within a shared movie universe. With each new entry, the MCU has grown in size (expanding its own universe of heroes, gods, and monsters) as well as providing a blockbuster-ish superhero fantasy escapism for moviegoers around the world. Naturally, the franchise itself has proven to be a powerhouse juggernaut, cultivating large successful numbers at the box office with every entry, which demonstrate the mass appeal of costumed comic book heroes and the need for continuing the various MCU phase sagas in continuing already established ones as well as new ones to fill in the roster. Now, Marvel Studios and directors Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden gear up for the 21st theatrical motion picture installment of the MCU with the movie Captain Marvel. Is the movie “simple marvelous” or is it just a flat and uninspiring entry in the long-running cinematic universe? Read more

Deadpool 2 (2018) Review

A SEQUEL THAT REACHES A SATISFYING

EFFORT (NOT A MAXIMUM ONE)


 

In 2016, audience moviegoers were introduced to raunchy, darkly humor of the Marvel’s “merc with a mouth” comic book character in the movie Deadpool. Directed by Tim Miller, the movie, which starred Ryan Reynolds, Morena Baccarin, T.J. Miller, and Ed Skrein, follows the story of Wade Wilson, a mercenary, who develops cancer and undergoes a risky procedure that renders him deformed but granted with healing abilities; succumbing to the idea of getting even with the individual who made him this way. Despite the R-rating the movie received (a bit uncommon for a superhero movie of late), Deadpool was deemed a success, with many praising the violent and dark humor from its comic book source material as well as Reynolds portrayal of Wade Wilson. Given the success of the film, which raked in roughly $780 million at the worldwide box office (against its measly $58 million production budget), the movie was big hit and it was an almost forgone conclusion that a Deadpool sequel would be green-lit sometime after. Now, two years later, a follow-up sequel has finally materialized as 20th Century Fox and director David Leitch present the film Deadpool 2. Does this second installment keep in tone and presentation of how the first movie was or does its high expectations falter to what many are expecting in this sequel? Read more

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) Review

DESTINY HAS ARRIVED


 

There was an idea…to bring together a group of remarkable people….to see if we could become something more…so when they need us, we could fight the battles…. that they never could. Thus, such an idea was born in the year 2008 with the release of Iron Man, a superhero movie that set-in motion one of the most famous (and profitable) shared cinematic universe in the history of filmmaking titled the “Marvel Cinematic Universe” (or simply dubbed the “MCU”). While Iron Man was well-received from critics and moviegoers alike (bringing the iconic superhero character of Tony Stark to life via actor Robert Downey Jr.), it was the start of something that really did usher in the “golden age” of superheroes film, bring together a collective group of actors and actresses in portraying these popular comic book characters on the silver screen. The pool of comic book character to grace the big screen range from some of the more popular ones like Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Hulk, and Spider-Man to some of the more lesser known ones like Ant-Man, Doctor Strange, and the Guardians of the Galaxy. Each one of the 18 films (so far) in the MCU series brings a sense of palpable superhero merits to stand on its own foundation on their own solo adventures as well as the team-up superhero features that bring together a group of them to stop an overpowered enemy. The film themselves have taken its viewers on big adventure experience to the next one, from the streets of New York City in Spider-Man: Homecoming, to the fictional / technological African nation of Wakanda in Black Panther, to the battlefields of WWII in Captain America: The First Avenger, and to the mythical land of Asgard in the Thor movies, and to the farthest reaches of the cosmos with the Guardians of the Galaxy films. With the success of these movies (both in its fandom with Marvel fans and in causal moviegoers), the MCU (as a whole) has continued to grow and expanded, especially when Disney acquisitioned Marvel to bring the superhero world into the “House of Mouse”, finding each new installment in their sequential Phases sagas to try to had another layer to the overall complexity to this cinematic world as well as being superhero entertainment to viewers everywhere. While some critics might be a bit miffed by “comic book movies” and in their criticism, the MCU movies have found their “golden ticket” formula of success with public (i.e a mixture of heart, humor, and blockbuster superhero nuances), raking in millions upon millions at the worldwide box office with each new release. Now, after the universal acclaim and huge financial success of Black Panther, Marvel Studios, in conjunction with their 10-year anniversary celebrations, and directors Joe and Anthony Russo prepare for the culmination of the Marvel Cinematic Universe with the highly anticipated film Avengers: Infinity War. Does super large superhero team-up film deliver on its inherit hype promise or does it flounder and ultimately crumble underneath the incredible high expectations from fans everywhere? Read more

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